Breens Florist

Flowers for Labor Day

We may be in the throes of the “dog days of summer” here in Houston, but the calendar tells a different story. As we approach the third week of August, it’s hard not to think that in a few short weeks, we’ll be celebrating Labor Day. The Breen’s Florist team of floral designers wants to help Houstonians create a summery atmosphere for your Labor Day weekend festivities.

At the end of the 19th century, Labor Day celebrations were just beginning. Labor Day always falls on a Monday – and more specifically, on the first Monday of September. This year, we’re observing the holiday on September 7th.

As sad as it is to admit that Labor Day represents the end of summer, you’ll be hard pressed to find anything that will stop a Texan from spending time at a barbecue. We’re not a bit shy about boasting that Texas and awesome barbecue are one in the same.

Labor Day became an official national holiday in 1894. Before President Grover Cleveland made the official proclamation, which he did after failing to end the railroad workers strike, the U.S. Congress passed legislation making the first Monday of September, an official holiday in the District of Columbia and the U.S. territories. That act was passed on June 28, 1894. By that point, 23 other states had already enacted their own laws to observe Labor Day on the first Monday of September.

Although there are undoubtedly regional traditions for celebrating Labor Day, the most common things that people do is having outdoor gatherings, heading to the beach, watching or participating in parades, or attending sporting events – especially baseball. As long as the weather cooperates, it’s safe to say that Houstonians will spend their holiday weekend enjoying the fantastic summer temperatures in Houston while making barbecues a big part of that.

If you’re going to be celebrating outside, consider flowering plants as an alternative to cut flowers. By opting for a flowering plant like our Azalea Abundance, you won’t be fraught with anxiety because you’re worried that someone may accidentally bump into a vase and spill all the water.